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Biological economies : experimentation and the politics of agri-food frontiers / edited by Richard Le Heron, Hugh Campbell, Nick Lewis and Michael Carolan.

Contributor(s): Le Heron, Richard B [editor.] | Campbell, Hugh, 1964- [editor.] | Lewis, Nick [editor.] | Carolan, Michael S [editor.].
Publisher: London : Routledge, 2018Description: 1 volume : illustrations (black and white) ; 24 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781138588936; 1138588938.Subject(s): Agriculture -- Economic aspects | Agriculture -- Social aspects | Agriculture and state | Agricultural industries | Rural developmentDDC classification: 338.19
Contents:
1 Assembling generative approaches in agri-food research -- PART 1 Re-making knowledges of agri-food -- 2 Biological economies and processes of consumption: practices, qualities and the vital materialism of food -- 3 The borderlands of animal disease: knowing and governing animal disease in biological economies -- 4 Re-shaping 'soft gold': fungal agency and the bioeconomy in the caterpillar fungus market assemblage -- 5 Enacting Swiss cheese: about the multiple ontologies of local food -- 6 Understanding agri-food systems as assemblages: worlds of rice in Indonesia -- 7 Materialising taste: fatty lambs to eating quality -- taste projects in New Zealand's red meat industry -- 8 Enactive encounters with the Langstroth hive: post-human framing of the work of bees in the Bay of Plenty -- 9 Ever-redder apples: how aesthetics shape the biology of markets -- 10 Value and values in the making of merino -- 11 Eating the unthinkable: The case of ENTO, eating insects and bioeconomic experimentation -- 12 Enacting BAdairying as a system of farm practices in New Zealand: towards an emergent politics of new soil resourcefulness? -- PART @ Enacting new politics of knowledge -- 13 In your face: why food is politics and why we are finally starting to admit it -- 14 Geographers at work in disruptive human-biophysical projects: methodology as ontology in reconstituting nature-society knowledge -- 15 Food utopias: performing emergent scholarship and agri-food futures -- 16 The very public nature of agri-food scholarship, and its problems and possibilities -- 17 Eating bioeconomies -- 18 Conclusion: biological economies as an academic and political project -- Index.
Abstract: Recent agri-food studies, including commodity systems, the political economy of agriculture, regional development, and wider examinations of the rural dimension in economic geography and rural sociology have been confronted by three challenges. These can be summarized as: `more than human' approaches to economic life; a `post-structural political economy' of food and agriculture; and calls for more `enactive', performative research approaches. This volume describes the genealogy of such approaches, drawing on the reflective insights of more than five years of international engagement and research. It demonstrates the kinds of new work being generated under these approaches and provides a means for exploring how they should be all understood as part of the same broader need to review theory and methods in the study of food, agriculture, rural development and economic geography. This radical collective approach is elaborated as the Biological Economies approach. The authors break out from traditional categories of analysis, reconceptualising materialities, and reframing economic assemblages as biological economies, based on the notion of all research being enactive or performative.-publisher's description.
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Book Book Wintec - City Campus
Wintec - City Campus
City Ground Floor 338.19 BIO (Browse shelf) Available h10619398

1 Assembling generative approaches in agri-food research -- PART 1 Re-making knowledges of agri-food -- 2 Biological economies and processes of consumption: practices, qualities and the vital materialism of food -- 3 The borderlands of animal disease: knowing and governing animal disease in biological economies -- 4 Re-shaping 'soft gold': fungal agency and the bioeconomy in the caterpillar fungus market assemblage -- 5 Enacting Swiss cheese: about the multiple ontologies of local food -- 6 Understanding agri-food systems as assemblages: worlds of rice in Indonesia -- 7 Materialising taste: fatty lambs to eating quality -- taste projects in New Zealand's red meat industry -- 8 Enactive encounters with the Langstroth hive: post-human framing of the work of bees in the Bay of Plenty -- 9 Ever-redder apples: how aesthetics shape the biology of markets -- 10 Value and values in the making of merino -- 11 Eating the unthinkable: The case of ENTO, eating insects and bioeconomic experimentation -- 12 Enacting BAdairying as a system of farm practices in New Zealand: towards an emergent politics of new soil resourcefulness? -- PART @ Enacting new politics of knowledge -- 13 In your face: why food is politics and why we are finally starting to admit it -- 14 Geographers at work in disruptive human-biophysical projects: methodology as ontology in reconstituting nature-society knowledge -- 15 Food utopias: performing emergent scholarship and agri-food futures -- 16 The very public nature of agri-food scholarship, and its problems and possibilities -- 17 Eating bioeconomies -- 18 Conclusion: biological economies as an academic and political project -- Index.

Recent agri-food studies, including commodity systems, the political economy of agriculture, regional development, and wider examinations of the rural dimension in economic geography and rural sociology have been confronted by three challenges. These can be summarized as: `more than human' approaches to economic life; a `post-structural political economy' of food and agriculture; and calls for more `enactive', performative research approaches. This volume describes the genealogy of such approaches, drawing on the reflective insights of more than five years of international engagement and research. It demonstrates the kinds of new work being generated under these approaches and provides a means for exploring how they should be all understood as part of the same broader need to review theory and methods in the study of food, agriculture, rural development and economic geography. This radical collective approach is elaborated as the Biological Economies approach. The authors break out from traditional categories of analysis, reconceptualising materialities, and reframing economic assemblages as biological economies, based on the notion of all research being enactive or performative.-publisher's description.

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