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Ahuwhenua : celebrating 80 years of Māori farming / Danny Keenan.

By: Keenan, Danny [author.].
Publisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Huia Publishers, 2013Description: xiii, 308 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781775501374; 177550137X.Subject(s): Ahuwhenua Trophy -- History | Agriculture -- Competitions -- New Zealand | Agriculture -- Awards -- New Zealand | Maori (New Zealand people) -- Agriculture | Ahu whenuaDDC classification: 630.993 LOC classification: S478.5.A1 | K44 2013
Contents:
Retaining the land -- to 1933 -- The early years of the Ahuwhenua trophy -- 1933-1939 -- The war years -- 1940-1945 -- Māori 'economic advancement' and farming -- 1945-1961 -- The 'spirit of friendly rivalry' -- 1962-1972 -- Challenges -- 1973-2002 -- Ahuwhenua continuing -- 2003-2013 -- 'Administering the policy effectively' -- Ahuwhenua trophy judging criteria 2013 -- Winners of the Ahuwhenua trophy 1933-2013.
"The Ahuwhenua Trophy was introduced in 1932 by Sir Apirana Ngata and Lord Bledisloe to encourage skill and proficiency in Maori farming. For many Maori incorporations, trusts and whanau-owned farms the Ahuwhenua Trophy is farming's highest award. This history of the Ahuwhenua Trophy Competition looks at the farming and business from 1933 to 2013. It sets out the establishment of the trophy, the ups and downs of the competition and the triumphs of the winners, and considers the competition in the context of Maori land-development policies and practices over the last eighty years. The trophy has come to be seen as the main agricultural award in New Zealand for all sheep, beef and dairy farmers, and its attention to environmental standards and protecting land and its resources for future generations is widely recognised in the agricultural sector" -- Publisher's information.-Includes bibliographical references.
Summary: "The Ahuwhenua Trophy was introduced in 1932 by Sir Apirana Ngata and Lord Bledisloe to encourage skill and proficiency in Māori farming. For many Māori incorporations, trusts and whānau-owned farms the Ahuwhenua Trophy is farming's highest award. This history of the Ahuwhenua Trophy Competition looks at the farming and business from 1933 to 2013. It sets out the establishment of the trophy, the ups and downs of the competition and the triumphs of the winners, and considers the competition in the context of Māori land-development policies and practices over the last eighty years. The trophy has come to be seen as the main agricultural award in New Zealand for all sheep, beef and dairy farmers, and its attention to environmental standards and protecting land and its resources for future generations is widely recognised in the agricultural sector"--Publisher's information.
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"The Ahuwhenua Trophy was introduced in 1932 by Sir Apirana Ngata and Lord Bledisloe to encourage skill and proficiency in Māori farming. For many Māori incorporations, trusts and whānau-owned farms the Ahuwhenua Trophy is farming's highest award. This history of the Ahuwhenua Trophy Competition looks at the farming and business from 1933 to 2013. It sets out the establishment of the trophy, the ups and downs of the competition and the triumphs of the winners, and considers the competition in the context of Māori land-development policies and practices over the last eighty years. The trophy has come to be seen as the main agricultural award in New Zealand for all sheep, beef and dairy farmers, and its attention to environmental standards and protecting land and its resources for future generations is widely recognised in the agricultural sector"--Publisher's information.

Includes bibliographical references.

Retaining the land -- to 1933 -- The early years of the Ahuwhenua trophy -- 1933-1939 -- The war years -- 1940-1945 -- Māori 'economic advancement' and farming -- 1945-1961 -- The 'spirit of friendly rivalry' -- 1962-1972 -- Challenges -- 1973-2002 -- Ahuwhenua continuing -- 2003-2013 -- 'Administering the policy effectively' -- Ahuwhenua trophy judging criteria 2013 -- Winners of the Ahuwhenua trophy 1933-2013.

"The Ahuwhenua Trophy was introduced in 1932 by Sir Apirana Ngata and Lord Bledisloe to encourage skill and proficiency in Maori farming. For many Maori incorporations, trusts and whanau-owned farms the Ahuwhenua Trophy is farming's highest award. This history of the Ahuwhenua Trophy Competition looks at the farming and business from 1933 to 2013. It sets out the establishment of the trophy, the ups and downs of the competition and the triumphs of the winners, and considers the competition in the context of Maori land-development policies and practices over the last eighty years. The trophy has come to be seen as the main agricultural award in New Zealand for all sheep, beef and dairy farmers, and its attention to environmental standards and protecting land and its resources for future generations is widely recognised in the agricultural sector" -- Publisher's information.-Includes bibliographical references.

"The Ahuwhenua Trophy was introduced in 1932 by Sir Apirana Ngata and Lord Bledisloe to encourage skill and proficiency in Māori farming. For many Māori incorporations, trusts and whānau-owned farms the Ahuwhenua Trophy is farming's highest award. This history of the Ahuwhenua Trophy Competition looks at the farming and business from 1933 to 2013. It sets out the establishment of the trophy, the ups and downs of the competition and the triumphs of the winners, and considers the competition in the context of Māori land-development policies and practices over the last eighty years. The trophy has come to be seen as the main agricultural award in New Zealand for all sheep, beef and dairy farmers, and its attention to environmental standards and protecting land and its resources for future generations is widely recognised in the agricultural sector"--Publisher's information.

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